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Explore history.

The World War I, Jazz Age, and the Great Depression unit.

The United States went through tremendous change during the early 1900s. The rest of the world was no different.

Through this unit, you will come to understand how the world was changing and how this affected the United States. Research your topics through media and print to discover the facts about World War I, the Jazz Age, and the Great Depression.

This unit is divided into separate "Activities." Each activity will help you to understand an important concept about the unit. Research resources are provided for many of the activities. Use these to help you save time.

Each activity will be graded separately in this unit.

World War I, the Jazz Age, and the Great Depression: Unit Overview

These are the required elements to this unit.

SS5H4 - The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.
SS5H4.a - Explain how German attacks on U.S. shipping during the war in Europe (1914-1917) ultimately led the U.S. to join the fight against Germany; include the sinking of the Lusitania and concerns over safety of U.S. ships, U.S. contributions to the war, and the impact of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919.
SS5H4.b - Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).
SS5H5 - The student will explain how the Great Depression and New Deal affected the lives of millions of Americans.
SS5H5.a - Discuss the Stock Market Crash of 1929, Herbert Hoover, Franklin Roosevelt, the Dust Bowl, and soup kitchens.
SS5H5.b - Analyze the main features of the New Deal; include the significance of the Civilian Conservation Corps, Works Progress Administration, and the Tennessee Valley Authority.
SS5H5.c - Discuss important cultural elements of the 1930s; include Duke Ellington, Margaret Mitchell, and Jesse Owens.

Mini-lessons will be covered in class each day by Mr. Brazile.You need to know the answers to these questions.

1. How did the United States become involved in World War I?
2. How did the United States change after World War I?
3. How did Louis Armstrong contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
4. How did Langston Hughes contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
5. How did Babe Ruth contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
6. How did Henry Ford contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
7. How did Charles Lindbergh contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
8. How did German attacks on U.S. shipping during the war in Europe lead the U.S. to join the fight against Germany?
9. How did Duke Ellington contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
10. How did Margaret Mitchell contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
11. How did Jesse Owens contribute to the cultural development of the United States?
12. How did the New Deal plan help the United States?
13. How did the Stock Market Crash of 1929 affect the United States?
14. How did the Herbert Hoover affect the United States during his presidency?
15. How did the Franklin Roosevelt affect the United States during his presidency?
16. How did the Dust Bowl affect the United States?
17. How did the soup kitchens affect the United States?

Use these resources to discover information for your unit.

Brittanica Database
EduCrate Videos
Unit Checklist
WWI Videos at History.com
The WWI, Jazz Age, and the Great Depression Unit: Activities
Create a vocabulary chart for the following terms in complete sentences.
  • Assembly Line
  • Civilian Conservation Corps
  • Depression (as it deals with an economy)
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Jazz Age
  • Tennessee Valley Authority
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • Trench Warfare
  • Works Progress Administration

Congratulations! You've been selected for the FBI's new division. Your job is to create a dossier file for all of the people listed below.

Turn all of the dossiers in together in alphabetical order.

Check out this example of what your dossier should look like for each person.





  • Louis Armstrong
  • Duke Ellington
  • Henry Ford
  • Herbert Hoover
  • Langston Hughes
  • Charles Lindbergh
  • Margaret Mitchell
  • Jesse Owens
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Babe Ruth

Videos for researching the important people.

Create a "Podcast" for the events listed below. This is a news podcast. Since most of the information of the era was passed along by radio, this podcast will be completed as if you are the person reporting on the event via the radio. Use descriptive words and include all relevant information. Consult rubric for "Dust Bowl," "Sinking of the Lusitania," "Soup Kitchens," and "Stock Market Crash of 1929."
If you don't have access to a voice recorder, write up the script you would use. Must be neat, with correct spelling and grammar.

If you complete this digitally, save your file as "lastname_subject_activityname" and turn in all files together.

  • Dust Bowl
  • Sinking of the Lusitania
  • Soup Kitchens
  • Stock Market Crash of 1929

Videos for the News Makers.

You're now working as a newspaper reporter. Your editor has given you the following topics to write news stories about for publication. Create a "news story" for each of the events listed below. Your news story should use proper grammar and spelling. Don't forget the Ws (Who, What, When, Where, Why).


Turn in all news stories together.


  • Great Depression
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • New Deal
  • World War I

Videos for the News Story projects.


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