on The Citizenship Webquest
image
  • slider
  • slider
  • slider
  • slider

Explore history.

The Citizenship unit.

The American Citizenship unit.

The United States of America began as a result of mistrust of heavy government. Our country was formed very specifically to avoid the pitfalls experienced by our forefathers.

Through this unit, you will come to understand how the United States of America's government is set up, the rights and duties of citizens, and how the economy plays a role. Research your topics through media and print to discover the facts about the United States of America's government.

Each activity will help you to understand an important concept about the unit. Research resources are provided for many of the activities. Use these to help you save time.

Each activity will be graded separately. All directions must be followed, use complete sentences and paragraphs, and include many details for the unit.

Every activity that is submitted should be labelled with your full name, the date completed, the activity number, and the activity name in order to receive credit. At this point in the year, all directions should be followed completely. Lack of any of these will result in the activity not being graded.

Citizenship: Unit Overview

These are the required elements to this unit.

SS5CG1 The student will explain how a citizen’s rights are protected under the U.S. Constitution.
  1. Explain the responsibilities of a citizen.
  2. Explain the freedoms granted and rights protected by the Bill of Rights.
  3. Explain the concept of due process of law and describe how the U.S. Constitution protects a citizen’s rights by due process.
SS5CG2 The student will explain the process by which amendments to the U.S. Constitution are made.
  1. Explain the amendment process outlined in the Constitution.
  2. Describe the purpose for the amendment process.
SS5CG3 The student will explain how amendments to the U. S. Constitution have maintained a representative democracy.
  1. Explain the purpose of the 12th and 17th amendments.
  2. Explain how voting rights were protected by the 15th, 19th, 23rd, 24th , and 26th amendments.

Mini-lessons will be covered in class each day by Mr. Brazile.You need to know the answers to these questions.

  1. How are a citizen's rights protected under the U.S. Constitution?

  2. What are the responsibilities of a U.S. citizen?

  3. How are amendments made to the U.S. Constitution?

  4. How do amendments to the U.S. Constitution maintain a representative democracy?

  5. What does "E pluribus unum" mean for our country?

Directions: Please read all of these thoroughly, understanding that as we progress through the year, expectations change.

  • Students are expected to follow mini-lesson discussions each day.
  • Students will use research tools (internet, textbook, encyclopedias, books, etc.) to research and discern information for projects.
  • Notes will be taken, along with citations of reference materials (Title/web URL, author).
  • Projects will include detailed information pertaining to the focused era.
  • All projects will be double-checked prior to turning in for grade.
  • Students can work projects in any order (suggested order is to follow the chronological order of the era).
  • Students should remember that if they want to complete a project based on a book, they should start the book early.
  • Each activity must include the student's full name, the date of completion, the activity name, and the activity number in order to receive credit.

Book Connections - Check out these books which relate to our unit.

  • The Story of the Constitution by Marilyn Prolman
  • True Book: The Bill of Rights by Patricia Quiri
  • The Story of the Supreme Court by Kenneth Richards
  • Know Your Government by George Ross
  • How Amendments are Adopted by Rich Smith
  • Story of the Nineteenth Amendment by Conrad R. Stein
  • The Day the Women Got the Vote: A Photo History of the Women's Right Movement by George Sullivan
Links to the books on Amazon.
The Citizenship Unit: Activities
Project Title: Vocabulary Flashcards
Directions: This project consists of researching the vocabulary listed below, find the correct definition in the context of our unit (government). You can create an account on Quizlet and create your flashcards there. While on Quizlet, click "link or embed," then copy the link and submit the link. You can choose another method to make your flashcards, digitally or hard copy (by hand). This activity is also showing you the usefulness of flashcards when studying vocabulary.

  • Amendment
  • Citizen
  • Constitution
  • Delegate
  • Democracy
  • Executive Branch
  • Freedom
  • Independence
  • Judicial Branch
  • Legislative Branch
  • Ratify
  • Republic
  • Responsibility
  • Rights
  • Suffrage
  • Tax
  • Union

Directions: Follow the directions listed below for each element. Submit all of the work together. These projects are introducing you to how to list information and your first informational paragraph.

Make a list of the responsibilities of a citizen of the United States of America.
List the freedoms granted and rights protected in the Bill of Rights.
Explain, in one well-written paragraph, how the United States Constitution protects a citizen’s rights by due process.

Directions: Follow the directions listed below for each element. Submit all of the work together. These projects focus on finding information, discerning the useful information, then forming a well-written paragrph to show your knowledge.

Explain, in one well-written paragraph, the amendment process outlined in the Constitution.
Explain, in one well-written paragraph, the purpose of the 12th and 17th amendments.
Explain, in one well-written paragraph, how voting rights were protected by the 15th, 19th, 23rd, 24th, and 26th amendments. (Explain each of the listed amendments.)


Back to Top