Explore science.

The Cells and Microorganisms unit.

Microscopes have been around for a long time (Look it up! Quite fascinating about early discoveries.). Robert Hooke improved upon microscopes and with it, he discovered cells in 1665. He named the structure "cells" because what he saw looked like the small rooms, or cells, that monks lived in at the time.

Through this unit, you will explore the basic structure and function of plant and animal cells. You'll also study creatures that can only be seen by microscopes - microorganisms. As you explore, you'll find how some are harmful and some are helpful.

Read all directions and make use of all resources. You are responsible for understanding everything presented on this unit. Please ask if you have questions once you've read it all.

All assignments under each activity heading should be turned in together. If turning the assignment in digitally, put them all in the same file or folder and submit one link.

Each activity will be graded separately in this unit.

Cells and Microorganisms: Unit Overview

These are the required elements to this unit.

S5L3 Parts of a Cell
Students will diagram and label parts of various cells (plant, animal, single-celled, multi-celled).
S5L3.a Observation of cell structure
Use magnifiers such as microscopes or hand lenses to observe cells and their structure.
S5L3.b Identify cell parts
Identify parts of a plant cell (membrane, wall, cytoplasm, nucleus, chloroplasts) and of an animal cell (membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus) and determine the function of the parts.
S5L3.c Multi-celled vs. single-celled organisms
Explain how cells in multi-celled organisms are similar and different in structure and function to single-celled organisms.
S5L4 Microorganisms and Larger Organisms
S5L4.a
ID beneficial microorganisms: Identify beneficial microorganisms and explain why they are beneficial.
S5L4.b
ID harmful microorganisms: Identify harmful microorganisms and explain why they are harmful.

Mini-lessons will be covered in class each day by Mr. Brazile.You need to know the answers to these questions.

What are the main parts of a plant cell?
What are the main parts of an animal cell?
What are the differences between a plant and animal cell?
What are the functions of the membrane, wall, cytoplasm, nucleus, chloroplasts in a plant cell?
What are the functions of the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus in an animal cell?
How are cells in a multi-celled organism similar to single-celled organisms?
How are cells in a multi-celled organism different to single-celled organisms?
How are cells in a multi-celled organism similar/different to cells in single-celled organisms?
What are beneficial microorganisms and how are they beneficial?
What are harmful microorganisms and how are they harmful?

Use these resources to discover information for your unit.

Videos








Bacteria

Science Text
Follow these steps for the Science text.
1. United States
2. Georgia
3. Cobb Co District, Marietta 30060
4. Kemp Elementary School, Powder Springs 30127
5. Username: kempstudent
6. Password: kempstudent
7. Use the text with the owl on the cover.
Kathi Mitchell's Cells Page
BrainPop
The Children's University of Manchester Microorganisms Page
Unit Checklist
The Cells and Microorganisms Unit: Activities
Due by: January 21, 2016
Unit Test: February 2, 2016

Unit Vocabulary

Check out our Science text (look under the "Resources" tab) for the easiest place to find our vocabulary terms.

Assignment


Make a chart using the computer (or neatly written) explaining the following terms:
  1. Beneficial
  2. Cell
  3. Cell Membrane
  4. Cell Wall
  5. Chloroplast
  6. Chlorophyll
  7. Cytoplasm
  8. Harmful
  9. Microscope
  10. Microorganism
  11. Multi-celled Organism
  12. Nucleus
  13. Photosynthesis
  14. Single-celled Organism
Due by: January 25, 2016
Unit Test: February 17, 2016

Observation of Cell Structure

Scientist with microscopeUse the Resources provided below to help you learn how to identify the parts of a plant or animal cell when seen through a microscope. Pay close attention, you'll need to label cell slides on the test. Notice what each component looks like and why it looks the way it does. Note the differences between a plant and an animal cell.


Onion CellCells look a lot different under a microscope. The onion cell to the left shows a definite pattern with its structure. What type of cell is an onion cell? (Your choices are "Plant Cell" or "Animal Cell,") What do you think makes it look so structured?





Onion cellLook at the next slide of an onion cell under a microscope. The parts are labeled. Can you see it now in the first picture? Click on the pictures for larger views.





Check out this video of an onion cell under a microscope. Can you see the cell wall? How about the nulcleus?



Let's look at two more plant cell slides that are not onions. See if you can see the same structures. Plant Cell Plant Cell









Animal CellNow we need to look at animal cells under a microscope. These are cheek cells. What is different from the plant cell? How about the structure. Why do plant cells need the structure and animal cells don't? See similarities? The nucleus, cytoplasm, and membrane are the same. Shape is different.


Animal CellLook at the other cheek cell slide and note how it looks. Click on any of thses pictures to see it bigger.





Assignment


Once you know each component, draw a plant cell as it looks when viewed through a microscope.

Label what you see. Include the nucleus, cell wall, cytoplasm, and chloroplasts.

Then, draw an animal cell as it looks when viewed through a microscope.

Label what you see. Include the nucleus, cell membrane, and cytoplasm.



Due by: January 28, 2016
Unit Test: February 2, 2016

Animal Cell

Use the Resources for this unit to help you learn the parts of an animal cell. Pay close attention, you'll need to label an animal cell on the test. Notice what each component does, what it looks like and why it looks the way it does.

Check out this video tour of a cell. You'll see the structure of plant and animal cells, along with the functions of those parts.

Assignment


Once you know each component, label an animal cell.
Check out this resource for how to label a cell.

 

Plant Cell

Use the Resources for this unit to help you learn the parts of a plant cell. Pay close attention, you'll need to label a plant cell on the test. Notice what each component does, what it looks like and why it looks the way it does.

Assignment


Once you know each component, label an plant cell.
Check out this resource for how to label a cell.

 


Assignment


Complete the Cells - Error Analysis. Be very detailed.
In the first section, state whether there is an error or not. For the "Explain Your Thinking" section, give a detailed reason for why there is or is not an error. IF more than one error, explain them all. Finally, cite where you found your information and include the quote or quotes that helped you complete the error analysis.

This rubric will be used to grade your work.

Assignment


Make an Aurasma. Your Aurasma will be a labeled cell. Take your pick - animal or plant.

Requirements:
  • Cell Type
  • Cell Membrane
  • Cell Wall (plant cells only, duh!)
  • Chloroplast (plant cells only again)
  • Cytoplasm
  • Nucleus

You can work with a partner on this one or by yourself. To submit this project, you'll need to submit a page with the username of the account on which the Aurasma was made. Make sure you shared it in Aurasma!
Due by:8:00am February 1, 2016
Unit Test: February 2, 2016

Multi-celled vs. Single-celled Organisms

Single-celled organisms are pretty straight forward - they're just one cell. Only one! That's it! Their name says exactly what they are.

Because they're just one cell, that cell has to do it all. It has to take care of all its business.

Watch ths video below to find out more about these organisms.

Now, what are multi-celled organisms? Just using common sense, I'm guessing that they have more than one cell.

I guessed correctly, these organisms have more than one cell. What does this mean for the whole organism? It means each cell has a specific function. Those cells will work together to form....well, you figure out what they form. Watch the video below to see more about these multi-celled organisms.

Coming Soon


Assignment


Develop a presentation of your choice.

Include the following information:
  • Single-celled organism defintiion
  • Multi-celled organism definition
  • Explain how single-celled organisms are similar in structure to multi-celled organisms.
  • Explain how single-celled organisms are similar in function to multi-celled organisms.
  • Explain how single-celled organisms are different in structure to multi-celled organisms.
  • Explain how single-celled organisms are different in function to multi-celled organisms.

Due by: February 1, 2016
Unit Test: February 2, 2016

Microorganisms

What are they good for? Absolutely nothing, say it again! Actually, they're quite important to life. Some play a positive role, some play a negative role. Some even play both roles!


Assignment


Watch "Helpful and Harmful Microorganisms" video below (or click that link) and complete the Microorganisms Video exercise.
Great Facts Interesting, strange, and funny.
Dropbox: Submit your work here.

Use below (or this link) to send activities to me digitally. You can send files up to 75mb, but that might clog my dropbox. Please limit the size of pictures to conserve space.
If you use this at school, you must be signed into the network. You can not be connected to the BYOD network.

Make sure you title your file with your name and the assignment title.
Example: lastname_subject_activityname

Use the link below to send activities to me digitally. Please limit the size of pictures to conserve space.

Make sure you title your file with your name and the assignment title.

Example: lastname_subject_activityname

Click here to save your work on Office 365.
Click here to save your work through Dropittome.


Back to Top